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Ed Caudill

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School of Journalism & Electronic Media
Professor

Edward Caudill, professor of journalism, received a B.A. in English literature from the University of Cincinnati, a M.A. in journalism from Ohio State University, Columbus, and a Ph.D. in mass communications from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. Caudill worked in newspapers for about seven years in Ohio, most of those years at the Columbus Citizen-Journal. He has published in Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Journalism Monographs, Media History Digest, Journalism History, The Journal of the History of Ideas, and has presented papers to the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, the American Journalism Historians' Association, the International Communications Association, and the American Studies Association. Much of his research focuses on the history of ideas in the press, including his book "Darwinism in the Press: The Evolution of an Idea," and Journalism Monograph, "The Roots of Bias: An Empiricist Press and Coverage of the Scopes Trial."

He co-authored with Dr. Paul Ashdown "The Mosby Myth: A Confederate Hero in Life and Legend," and "The Myth of Nathan Bedford Forrest." He and Dr. Ashdown recently completed the trilogy on Civil War figures, the popular press, and popular culture with a book on the legends and myths that have grown up around Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman and his March to the Sea.

His teaching areas are reporting and history.

Contact
431 Communications Bldg.
Education: 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
M.S., Ohio State University
B.A., University of Cincinnati

Research Interests: 
The history of ideas in the press
International Interests: 

Dr. Caudill has done research in archives at Cambridge University, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, and Imperial College, London. Dr. Caudill was also involved in a student exchange program called “Nacel” in which students from France came to UT to study mass communications in the 1990s.